10 articles Building a Web Server

Sched­ule backups of web­sites

The most com­mon way to auto­mat­ic­ally run scripts at sched­uled times is through cron. For example, you can use cron to make sched­uled web requests to a spe­cif­ic URL on your web­site. This is a reli­able way to per­form peri­od­ic work, such as mail­ing users or gen­er­at­ing reports. Word­Press and Drupal have imple­men­ted sys­tems that…

How to upload web­site backups to Drop­box

See more info here Drop­box Upload­er is a BASH script which can be used to upload, down­load, delete, list files (and more!) from Drop­box, an online file shar­ing, syn­chron­iz­a­tion and backup ser­vice. It’s writ­ten in BASH script­ing lan­guage and only needs cURL. You can take a look to the GiHub pro­ject page. Why use this…

Mul­tiple Web Serv­ers over a Single IP, Using Apache as a Reverse Proxy

I don’t get to play with the IT side of things quite as much as I would like to.  So I enjoy the little things, like learn­ing how to use a reverse proxy on Apache.  At home, I only have one IP com­ing in with my reg­u­lar Inter­net con­nec­tion, and I want the abil­ity to…

How to install Drupal on your Ubuntu Serv­er

Drupal is a robust Con­tent Man­age­ment Sys­tem that runs on a LAMP serv­er. The LAMP serv­er uses MySQL by default, but Post­gr­eSQL can also be used with Drupal. It can host blogs, for­ums, and a vari­ety of oth­er con­tent. It has a huge selec­tion of add-ons mod­ules for oth­er func­tion­al­ity, such as advert­ising, chat­box, e‑commerce,…

Con­fig­ure your Linux net­work inter­face

1. View Net­work Set­tings of an Eth­er­net Adapter Ifcon­fig, when invoked with no argu­ments will dis­play all the details of cur­rently act­ive inter­faces. If you give the inter­face name as an argu­ment, the details of that spe­cif­ic inter­face will be dis­played. # ifcon­fig eth0 eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWad­dr 00:2D:32:3E:39:3B inet addr:192.168.2.2 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr:…

Installing Apache, PHP and MySQL

Now that you’ve installed Linux and secured your Serv­er, it’s time to start doing stuff with it. In this guide, you’ll learn how to host a web­site. Start by installing a web serv­er, data­base, and PHP — a pop­u­lar com­bin­a­tion which is com­monly referred to a LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP). Then cre­ate or import…

Dis­abling SSH Pass­word Authen­tic­a­tion and Root Login

You just strengthened the secur­ity of your serv­er by adding a new user and gen­er­at­ing SSH keys. Now it’s time to make some changes to the default SSH con­fig­ur­a­tion. First, you’ll dis­ablepass­word authen­tic­a­tion to require all users con­nect­ing via SSH to use key authen­tic­a­tion. Next, you’ll dis­able root login to pre­vent the root user from log­ging…

Adding a New User

Adding a New User   Debian/​​Ubuntu Open a ter­min­al win­dow and log into your Linux serv­er with Putty. Cre­ate the user by enter­ing the fol­low­ing com­mand. Replace exampleuser with your desired user­name: 1 add­user exampleuser Add the user to the admin­is­ter the sys­tem (admin) group by enter­ing the fol­low­ing com­mand. Replace exampleuser with your user­name: 1…

Set­ting up the basics — web serv­er

Set­ting the Host­name You’ll need to set your system’s host­name and fully qual­i­fied domain name (FQDN). Your host­name should be some­thing unique. Some people name their serv­ers after plan­ets, philo­soph­ers, or anim­als. Note that the system’s host­name has no rela­tion­ship to web­sites or email ser­vices hos­ted on it, aside from provid­ing a name for the…